Laura on Sennen Cove

Land's End, Cornwall

Land’s End, as you might expect, marks the end of the British earth at its southwesterly tip in Cornwall. It’s an iconic Cornish destination, and has fascinated visitors for centuries. Once called ‘Belerion’, meaning ‘place of the sun’ in ancient Greek, it’s since inspired hordes of visitors seeking the end of the earth. Many would head to The First & Last Inn before making the final steps to ‘Penn-an-Wlas’ (or Land’s End in Cornish). Nowadays, it’s still an impressive attraction. We began our journey to Land’s End from Lelant, with a few stops along the way.

Porthcurno, Cornwall

Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful sights on your way to Land’s End is Porthcurno Beach. It has won a bunch of awards over the years, and it’s not difficult to see why. The water is a beautiful turquoise colour that sparkles in the sun, and the sand is white and fine. Although popular, it never feels too busy either.

Porthcurno Beach, Cornwall

On one side, there’s a stream that flows which is perfect for paddling, and high up on the cliffs is the famous Minack Theatre. Built back in the 1920s by theatrical visionary Rowena Wade and her gardener, you can watch shows with the most incredible of backgrounds. My tip is to park at the Minack Theatre and walk to the coast to enjoy the sprawling cliff views.

Near Land's End, Cornwall

We wondered right out of the car park to explore the incredible views. There is quite an interesting sensation you get, being right at the end of the island, with just ocean for miles and miles. It reminded me a little of Vancouver Island’s Wild Pacific Trail.

Porthcurno, Cornwall

If you take the path to your left from Porthcurno Beach, you’ll see Logan Rock. Renowned for its 80 ton granite rocking stone, it’s a very pleasant thirty minute walk. There’s also the inspiring Porthcurno Telegraph Museum, which offers history on Cornwall’s important role in communications. It was an integral part of the pioneering telegraph business, and is handily just a short walk from Porthcurno Beach.

Near Land's End, Cornwall

Land’s End, Cornwall

Hopping back into the car, we discovered the main attraction: Land’s End. Park up and take in the incredible views from the very tip of the UK. You can’t miss getting a photo with the legendary Land’s End signpost!

Land's End sign, England

Just a meagre 874 miles up to the northern tip of the UK at John O’Groats. Soak in the gorgeous coastal views before indulging in some of the other activities at Land’s End. There’s the West Country Shopping Village for gifts and souvenirs, and a few spots for food. Check out the Cornish Pantry for hot and cold bakes, or a sweet treat from the Land’s End Doughnut Company. There’s also a lovely Land’s End Restaurant where you can enjoy delicious cuisine with a view across the Atlantic Ocean.

Land's End, Cornwall

Throughout the summer, there’s a host of other activity that takes place for all the family. There are games, performers, and lots of other entertainment to enjoy. Don’t miss the Magic in the Skies fireworks display from Land’s End every Tuesday and Thursday throughout the summer.

Land's End, Cornwall

Sennen Cove, Cornwall

Having checked out everything there was to see at Land’s End, we got into the car and pootled on to Sennen Cove. One of my favourite beaches in Cornwall, it’s perfect for visiting at sunset thanks to its glorious displays. Go late evening to enjoy the pink skies over the turquoise ocean.

Sennen Cove, Cornwall
Sennen Cove, Cornwall

We arrived early to grab dinner from the local pub, The Old Success Inn. Here, we ordered a pie and mash and a lasagne and tucked in.

Sunset over Sennen Cove, Cornwall

To walk it off, we went for a wander along Sennen Cove at sunset. Thanks to the long stretch of beach and lack of obstruction, you get a great view here.

Sunset over Cornwall, UK
Sunset over Sennen Cove, Cornwall

It’s also an excellent beach for surfing, as the most westerly point of Cornwall. The Pedn-men-du at the south end of Sennen Cove also protects the beach from Atlantic gales.

Sennen Cove, Cornwall
Laura on Sennen Cove

Sennen Cove is a wonderful place to watch the sunset. We watched in awe as the golden disc ducked down beneath the ocean, and the sky lit up.

Laura on Sennen Cove, Cornwall
Sunset over Sennen Cove, Cornwall

A lovely end to our final evening in Cornwall.

Carbis Bay, Cornwall

The next morning, we woke early to make the most of the morning in Cornwall. We rose, packed up our belongings and loaded the car, and headed out. Feeling hungry, we set off for St Ives once again.

Porthkidney Beach
Porthkidney Beach

Taking the trail along Porthkidney Beach again, the weather was rather cloudier. It doesn’t matter how the weather is in this part of the world as the coast and ocean look gorgeous no matter what.

Carbis Bay, Cornwall
Carbis Bay, Cornwall

We reached Carbis Bay, having worked up quite an appetite. Not long, and we got to St Ives.

Carbis Bay, Cornwall

Once in St Ives, we hit up the harbour and found a spot for breakfast. If you too are hungry in St Ives, head to Hub for brunch.

Brunch at St Ives, Cornwall

We ordered coffees and I had eggs royale which was pretty tasty. The perfect sustenance for a long drive back to Cheltenham. With just a pitstop en route in Padstow for coffee and pasties, we made it back that afternoon before jumping on a train to London.


Another wonderful weekend in Cornwall, and it was great to finally tick off Land’s End from my bucket list. Where are your favourite places to holiday?

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